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Spin Bike Hacks

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After 550 rides with my first love – this Sunny Exercise Bike – I’ve finally taken the plunge and treated myself to a Keiser M3i.  It is a beauty!   My Sunny was still in great shape and in fact, I gave it to a good friend.  I just wanted something new and shiny now that I proved to myself that I am in this for the long hall.  According to my calculations, I think spent about $0.75 per ride with over 500 rides.

My readers are always on the lookout for a quality Peloton resistance conversion chart.  A copy of a resistance chart to complete the “Peloton Hack” is probably THE number one request I receive.  As I noted in my earlier “How to Measure Resistance with the Peloton App” post, the questions usually sound like this:

  • How do I  convert Peloton resistance to my Sunny or Keiser M3i?
  • Is it worth it to buy these fancy power pedals (pretty cool, check them out!)?
  • Is there anything similar to this Wahoo cadence sensor that will measure resistance?
  • How do I measure resistance on my Sunny?
  • How do I convert Peloton resistance when using my own bike with the Peloton App?
  • Should I just give up on life and buy one of these?  (Just kidding…)

Read on to learn more about resistance and see various Peloton conversion resistance charts for Sunny, Keiser, Echelon and NordicTrack spin bikes!

I did it!  500 rides with my trusty Sunny Bike and the Peloton App (with the help of a global pandemic…).  There were no shoutouts from the Peloton instructors, no balloons or fanfare but just a GIANT sense of accomplishment!  I am SO happy to have hit this milestone.  I am in the best shape of my life and have found a new community of friends along the way.

Now that I have hit the 500 ride milestone I have decided to upgrade my bike.  My Sunny still works great but I have decided to buy something a  bit fancier now that I have proven to myself that I am in this for the long haul.  Believe me, the Sunny was well worth my initial investment – per my math, it came out to about $0.75 per ride!  Not too shabby.  Using your own bike with the Peloton App has a lot of advantages, price being one of them.

Peloton App + Sunny

After a lot of debate between a Peloton and a Keiser M3i, please read on to see why I decided to buy the Keiser….

This post contains updates to my original “Peloton Alternative” post.

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The Peloton Bike! I saw the commercials and was hooked. Over 10,000 on-demand group spinning classes right in the comfort of my own home? You mean I never have to find someone to watch my kids, get in a car and drive to the gym?  A dream come true – sign me up!  (Plus, I am assuming that it must come with a housekeeper because everyone’s homes seem so neat and tidy.)

Then I saw the price tag…almost $3,000 right off the bat when you add delivery, special shoes, etc. plus a $468 yearly subscription ($39 per month).  Yikes!  I wish I could afford it – I really do but I already have a graveyard of exercise gadgetry and workout DVDs in my house.  I didn’t want to splurge on a Peloton bike only for it to gather dust in the corner like my old treadmill.

So many questions ran through my head:

I get a lot of emails asking me to respond with a simple list of all the bits and bobs needed to use the Peloton App with your own spin bike (meaning, without the actual Peloton bike).  Well, in addition to replying to those emails, I thought that I would post my advice here, too.

Of course, my detailed review of the Peloton App with all the lovely pictures and videos can be found in my super popular Peloton Alternative post!

Here is my list

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