After 550 rides with my first love – this Sunny Exercise Bike – I’ve finally taken the plunge and treated myself to a Keiser M3i.  It is a beauty!   My Sunny was still in great shape and in fact, I gave it to a good friend.  I just wanted something new and shiny now that I proved to myself that I am in this for the long hall.  According to my calculations, I think spent about $0.75 per ride with over 500 rides.

The 2nd most popular question I get (the first being about my disco ball) is about shoes and cleats. For the first couple of years after purchasing my Sunny I just wore my running sneakers and slipped my foot into the toe cage. It seemed fine and I was content but I did have a lingering curiosity.  After 525 rides on my Sunny I upgraded to a Keiser M3i which, like the Sunny, had toe cages on one side of pedal but also allowed me to “clip in” on the other side.  I finally took the plunge and bought some cycling shoes but holy smokes, the whole process was very confusing!!  Only certain shoes are compatible with certain cleats that are only compatible with certain pedals.  In fact, I initially even bought the wrong type.  Ugh. It was like learning a whole new language!  I thought I would share what I learned:

My readers are always on the lookout for a quality Peloton resistance conversion chart.  A copy of a resistance chart to complete the “Peloton Hack” is probably THE number one request I receive.  As I noted in my earlier “How to Measure Resistance with the Peloton App” post, the questions usually sound like this:

  • How do I  convert Peloton resistance to my Sunny or Keiser M3i?
  • Is it worth it to buy these fancy power pedals (pretty cool, check them out!)?
  • Is there anything similar to this Wahoo cadence sensor that will measure resistance?
  • How do I measure resistance on my Sunny?
  • How do I convert Peloton resistance when using my own bike with the Peloton App?
  • Should I just give up on life and buy one of these?  (Just kidding…)

Read on to learn more about resistance and see various Peloton conversion resistance charts for Sunny, Keiser, Echelon and NordicTrack spin bikes!

I just streamed my first Peloton class today from their new London studio with UK based instructor Leanne Hainsby!  She is super energetic, I love the accent and she is serious competition to knock  Emma Lovewell, my current favorite Peloton instructor, out of the No. 1 spot.  She also left me drenched in sweat.  I look forward to taking many more classes with Leanne.  This is all virtual, of course, I did not hop on a plane to Peloton’s London studio, although that would be nice.  🙂

I also just learned that Peloton will be opening a studio in Australia post-pandemic! I cannot wait to meet the new instructors.

APPS for spinningCoke vs. Pepsi, McDonalds vs. Burger King and now, Peloton vs. Apple Fitness+!   The ultimate battle of the fitness apps and the best app for spinning. Peloton is undoubtedly the leader in the at-home spin movement and has a several year head start which was only bolstered by the pandemic.  Its instructors are now celebrities with their own clothing lines and a massive social media following.   If you have been following my blog, you know that while I cannot afford a Peloton bike (I started with a Sunny and after a couple of years upgraded to a Keiser M3i) I am a HUGE fan of the Peloton App – spin, cardio, HIIT, yoga – the classes are all exceptional.

But now Apple Fitness+ is in town with guns blazing!  Apple Fitness+ is Apple’s new fitness app powered by Apple Watch (it doesn’t work without the watch)I thought it would be helpful if I provided a comparison between the two based on my early experiences.

Hi gang,

Since upgrading from my Sunny to a Keiser M3i (after 525 rides, thank you very much) I started noticing people posting online these really cool looking graphs from mPaceline.  Intrigued I signed up for the free trial and then moved on to the yearly plan (it was something like $25 for the year). mPaceline is a cycling and running workout App designed to help you visualize your exercise/training metrics. The App works best if you are taking spinning or running classes that provide metrics on your class performance. It’s primarily focused on individuals that own a Peloton Bike, Tread or owners of 3rd-party equipment that use the Peloton Digital App with attached power and cadence meters (like my Keiser). 

Anyway, I started writing a post about all the things I enjoyed about the app but felt like I was falling short describing the awesomeness of this Peloton hack so I reached out to “RiderPaul”, the developer behind mPaceline, and asked that he author a guest post for my readers. I actually met Paul AFTER creating a dedicated mPaceline Facebook group after looking for some like minded users.  Come join – it has grown very fast and full of tips, tricks and helpful advice!

Below, Paul provides some basic information about mPaceline as well as equipment advice for those getting started with Peloton. 

Over to you, Paul:


Here it is – this year’s No. 1 Peloton App Accessory! Plenty of pictures and videos below.

Whether you are shopping for someone that needs a little more fun spinning at home or you are looking to spice up your spin life, this gadget is a no-brainer!

Pin It